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FIV November

November 2011
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IN THIS ISSUE

1. Pet of the month competition
2. Pet of the Month Winner - August
3. Pet of the Month Winner - September
4. Grass-seed danger in Spring
5. A pinch of prevention
6. A sniff of something good
7. Have you heard?
8. Fight off the flab
9. Travelling ticks



1. Pet of the month competition

Sanford Veterinary Clinic and ‘Cammi' the Clinic cat would love you to enter your pet in our new ‘Pet of the month' Competition. Each month we will upload your pet's photo onto our Facebook page with a short description of them. You can do this by sending your photo to our email address This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it .

Each month we choose one winner and you will receive fantastic prizes. The prizes can include; dog or cat biscuits, flea products, shampoos, beds and some fun toys for your pet. Your pet's photo and a short story will then be published in the next month's newsletter that we send our clients through email. To ensure you get the newsletter go to our website www.sanfordvet.com.au and enter in your email address. We look forward to seeing your pet's photos sometime soon.



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2. Pet of the Month Winner - August

Cammi the clinic cat was busy raiding the liver treats jar again and missed the deadline for the Pet of the Month in the last newsletter. So this month we have two winners! Sanford Veterinary Clinic would like to congratulate ‘Misty and Zoe' winner of the Pet of the Month photo competition for August, sent in by her owner Theresa who says-

'Zoe is a brown Burmese who has a natural mohawk. I say it's to let us know that, even though she is our sweet bubba girl, she does have 'cattitude'. She has three legs due to an injury when she was about 3 weeks old at the breeders. She is in no way handicapped, she is the instigator of the crew and can out run all the rest. Misty appeared at the house one day when she was about 6 weeks old, and followed Ross around outside all day. When he came in for the night, she followed him in and hasn't looked back!'

They won a heap of prizes including Grooming brushes, Frontline Monthly Flea timer, Previcox Heating Pad, Cat Toy, Frontline Umbrella and Rogz Stickers and cards. Enjoy!



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3. Pet of the Month Winner - September

The Lucky winner for September was 'Aurah' sent in by owner Rita. Aurah is a Japanese Spitz and obviously a snappy dresser. I'm sure Aurah and Rita will enjoy all the prizes they have won. Once again it was a hard choice from all the entries we have received. To view all the photos on our facebook page please just click on the facebook link on our website www.sanfordvet.com.au



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4. Grass-seed danger in Spring

During spring it is common for pets to develop abscesses and infections caused by penetrating grass seeds. Grass seeds can gradually work their way through a pet's skin aided by the bristles on the seed. Unfortunately this is often hidden by the pet's hair and not noticed until there is a severe infection or a discharging abscess.

This problem is very common in certain areas and in certain breeds. So what can you do to help prevent this problem?

  • Check your pets ears daily.
  • Check your pets paws daily.
  • Have your dog clipped if you are in an area with lots of grass seeds- this will make grass seeds easier to see and also help prevent grass seeds adhering. Have any constant licking, head shaking or pawing at ears investigated by Sanford Veterinary Clinic as soon as possible.
  • Remove any grass seeds trapped in the hair coat.


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5. A pinch of prevention

In human and animal health, it is always better to prevent disease rather than fix it. This idea is particularly important in our job and it is one of the topics we talk most about.

We are now able to prevent diseases that 30 years ago may have caused serious illness or even death. Vaccination is one of the best examples of this.

The three core diseases we vaccinate dogs against are:

1. Distemper virus
2. Parvovirus
3. Hepatitis

There is a registered vaccine available that can protect your dog against these core diseases for three years. We will advise you if this vaccine is suitable for your dog.

No matter what, your dog must still receive a vaccine against Canine Cough once a year. This is also a very good time for us to give your dog a health check to detect any diseases as early as possible. Prevention is always better than cure! You should think of your pet’s yearly visit to us as a health check up rather than a yearly shot or jab.

Our furry feline friends require a yearly check up too. There is not yet a registered three yearly vaccine available for cats.

Feel free to discuss your pet’s vaccination regime with us at any time.



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6. A sniff of something good

Summer is nearly upon us and many dogs will be spending time in boarding kennels. Despite having received a vaccination, some dogs will still develop Canine Cough (also referred to as Kennel Cough).

The cough is spread via droplets of infected fluid that are exhaled into the air. This can commonly occur at places dogs congregate in such as the park, dog day care centres, grooming facilities and of course kennels. It does not mean the place is unhygienic or dirty and transmission is very common.

Vaccination gives your dog some prevention against the most potent strains of the disease, similar to a flu vaccine for humans.

The good news is that there is a fast acting intranasal vaccine (nasal drops) that can be given to reduce to risk of this disease occurring. The nasal drops stimulate the production of antibodies on the actual airway lining itself (mimicking the disease) and results in excellent protection.

If your dog is going to be boarding in kennels this summer, ask us about the intranasal vaccine. Don't forget to allow at least 5 days for the vaccine to stimulate immunity.



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7. Have you heard?

Have you heard about Harbor, the hound with the world’s longest ears? His left ear measures 31cm and his right ear 34 cm!

Harbor is a Coonhound, a breed developed to hunt with their long ears helping to sweep scents towards the nose.

Amazingly, Harbor’s ear span is 66cm which is even greater than the 59.7cm height of the world’s shortest man. See a video of this adorable dog here.

Does your pet have a special feature? We’d love to hear all about it. Send us a photo and a description and we’ll publish it on our My Pet Stories Website.

Of course there are also some movie tickets up for grabs for the stand out entries. Email your entry to This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it '; document.write( '' ); document.write( addy_text85463 ); document.write( '<\/a>' ); //--> This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it



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8. Fight off the flab

There is a great saying “if your dog is overweight, you’re not getting enough exercise”. Physical activity plays a crucial part in maintaining a healthy weight for your dog but what YOU put in your dog’s mouth is just as important.

Treats and snacks can stack on the kilos and food is an easy way to show love as it comes with the instant gratification of your pet’s attention and satisfaction. But you could be killing your pet with kindness!

Alarming evidence suggests that over 20% of all dogs in Australia are obese. Many people do not realise that their pet is overweight and are not aware of the potential health dangers associated with canine couch potatoes.

Obesity puts our pets at risk for many of the same problems that the human obesity causes, including heart disease, respiratory disorders, osteoarthritis, and diabetes.

Bring your pet in for a body weight check with us and we can work out your pet’s goal weight and help get your pet started on a prescription calorie controlled diet.

And of course getting out and about with your dog not only helps your pooch burn calories; you will reap the benefits too. Click here to see a great initiative that has been started in the UK to target obesity in pets and people.



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9. Travelling ticks

The family holiday at Narooma was idyllic. While the kids had played in the sand and surf, Bindi the cat had spent her days sleeping in the sunny backyard at their holiday house.

When the family arrived back home, Bindi developed the wobbles in her hind legs. A trip to the clinic and a full body clip revealed the culprit - a swollen blood filled paralysis tick buried head first into her skin.

The paralysis tick lives along the east coast of Australia (as can be seen on the map to the left). Once the tick attaches at a suitable site it begins to engorge with blood and will inject a potent toxin that causes an ascending muscle paralysis.

Common signs include:
• weakness in the legs or inability to get up
• drooling, coughing or gagging
• difficulty breathing

The scary fact is that you can bring a tick back in your luggage or camping gear so you don't need to live in or your pet doesn’t need to travel to a tick infested area to be at risk.

If you notice any of the above signs and you have visited or live in a paralysis tick area seek veterinary advice immediately.

Thankfully Bindi survived her ordeal but not before she had a lengthy stay in hospital. Speak to us about the best preventative options for your pet.



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Sanford Vet clinic


42 Sanford St
Geraldton, WA 6530

PH: 9921 1797


www.sanfordvet.com.au
 

 

 

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